Manchester Art Gallery

Trans Men Wear It Well

Trans Vegas host this stylish evening at Manchester Art Gallery bringing together trans men discussing how they wear masculinity, feminism, pregnancy and, of course, clothes.

The event will feature a first look at the Gallery’s new couture acquisitions dating back from the  19th century to the present day. We are excited to have a  EJ Scott, curator of the Museum of Transology, chairing the event. As Scott puts it, “We will be discussing why men can’t wear what they want, and how this links to trans rights being a struggle for equal rights for all genders”

This round table event will include invited contributions from Jamie Hale, Zorian Clayton and HUSK as well as creating places for everyone to take a seat should they wish.

Doors will open at 6pm for drinks, informal chat and to view the collection. At 7pm you will take your seat to observe or take part in the round table discussion. Your £5.00 ticket includes a free glass of wine or seasonal soft drink.

Booking

Book tickets at Eventbrite.

With thanks for the support and funding for this event from Arts Council England and the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund.

CYC + Young Identity: Old Tools > New Masters /= New Futures,

Contact Young Company and Young Identity are set for a 3-day takeover of Manchester Art Gallery to explore what it means to decolonise public culture. Developing an alternative tour, they invite audiences to think differently, ask questions and dismantle the gallery experience. What does a postcolonial future look like? Maybe it looks like Beyonce in the Louvre or a Black Panther out-take or maybe we can come up with something even better…

Directed by Tunde Adefioye (dramaturg at KVS, the Royal Flemish Theatre in Brussels), this mouthy Mancunian mix-up will use both poetry and theatre as creative tools.

Booking

Tickets are available from Contact.

CYC + Young Identity: Old Tools > New Masters /= New Futures,

Contact Young Company and Young Identity are set for a 3-day takeover of Manchester Art Gallery to explore what it means to decolonise public culture. Developing an alternative tour, they invite audiences to think differently, ask questions and dismantle the gallery experience. What does a postcolonial future look like? Maybe it looks like Beyonce in the Louvre or a Black Panther out-take or maybe we can come up with something even better…

Directed by Tunde Adefioye (dramaturg at KVS, the Royal Flemish Theatre in Brussels), this mouthy Mancunian mix-up will use both poetry and theatre as creative tools.

Booking

Tickets are available from Contact.

CYC + Young Identity: Old Tools > New Masters /= New Futures,

Contact Young Company and Young Identity are set for a 3-day takeover of Manchester Art Gallery to explore what it means to decolonise public culture1. Developing an alternative tour, they invite audiences to think differently, ask questions and dismantle the gallery experience. What does a postcolonial future look like? Maybe it looks like Beyonce in the Louvre or a Black Panther out-take or maybe we can come up with something even better…

Directed by Tunde Adefioye (dramaturg at KVS, the Royal Flemish Theatre in Brussels), this mouthy Mancunian mix-up will use both poetry and theatre as creative tools.

Booking

Tickets are available from Contact.

 


1. Decolonisation is the undoing of colonialism, the latter being the process whereby a nation establishes and maintains its domination on overseas territories. The concept particularly applies to the dismantlement, during the second half of the 20th century, of the colonial empires established prior to World War I throughout the world.

CYC + Young Identity: Old Tools > New Masters /= New Futures,

Contact Young Company and Young Identity are set for a 3-day takeover of Manchester Art Gallery to explore what it means to decolonise public culture1. Developing an alternative tour, they invite audiences to think differently, ask questions and dismantle the gallery experience. What does a postcolonial future look like? Maybe it looks like Beyonce in the Louvre or a Black Panther out-take or maybe we can come up with something even better…

Directed by Tunde Adefioye (dramaturg at KVS, the Royal Flemish Theatre in Brussels), this mouthy Mancunian mix-up will use both poetry and theatre as creative tools.

Booking

Tickets are available from Contact.

 


1. Decolonisation is the undoing of colonialism, the latter being the process whereby a nation establishes and maintains its domination on overseas territories. The concept particularly applies to the dismantlement, during the second half of the 20th century, of the colonial empires established prior to World War I throughout the world.

CYC + Young Identity: Old Tools > New Masters /= New Futures,

Contact Young Company and Young Identity are set for a 3-day takeover of Manchester Art Gallery to explore what it means to decolonise public culture1. Developing an alternative tour, they invite audiences to think differently, ask questions and dismantle the gallery experience. What does a postcolonial future look like? Maybe it looks like Beyonce in the Louvre or a Black Panther out-take or maybe we can come up with something even better…

Directed by Tunde Adefioye (dramaturg at KVS, the Royal Flemish Theatre in Brussels), this mouthy Mancunian mix-up will use both poetry and theatre as creative tools.

Booking

Tickets are available from Contact.

 


1. Decolonisation is the undoing of colonialism, the latter being the process whereby a nation establishes and maintains its domination on overseas territories. The concept particularly applies to the dismantlement, during the second half of the 20th century, of the colonial empires established prior to World War I throughout the world.

CYC + Young Identity: Old Tools > New Masters /= New Futures,

Contact Young Company and Young Identity are set for a 3-day takeover of Manchester Art Gallery to explore what it means to decolonise public culture1. Developing an alternative tour, they invite audiences to think differently, ask questions and dismantle the gallery experience. What does a postcolonial future look like? Maybe it looks like Beyonce in the Louvre or a Black Panther out-take or maybe we can come up with something even better…

Directed by Tunde Adefioye (dramaturg at KVS, the Royal Flemish Theatre in Brussels), this mouthy Mancunian mix-up will use both poetry and theatre as creative tools.

Booking

Tickets are available from Contact.

 


1. Decolonisation is the undoing of colonialism, the latter being the process whereby a nation establishes and maintains its domination on overseas territories. The concept particularly applies to the dismantlement, during the second half of the 20th century, of the colonial empires established prior to World War I throughout the world.

First Wednesday

See things differently after dark with this month’s eclectic line up.

Philosophy Cafe

6-8pm, meet in the cafe
The Philosophy cafe is the perfect opportunity to experience art and discuss a philosophical question, creating a space for people to talk and think together. The topic for this session is, ‘Can a photograph ever provide a true record of a situation?’

If you wonder what a Philosophy Cafe session might be like, check out this recent review.

Being Present / In The Footsteps

5.30pm-8pm
Join us for an evening of performances specially commissioned in response to our current exhibition Speech Acts: Reflection-Imagination-Reflection curated by Hammad Nasar with Kate Jesson.

Being Present is a performative response to the exhibition by artists Bettina Fung, Ada Hao and Nicholas Tee from Asia-Art-Activism, a research network exploring Asia, art and activism in the UK and beyond. Curated by Annie Jael Kwan.

In the Footsteps (of Delia Derbyshire and Li Yuan-chia) is a collaborative project between artist and filmmaker Madelon Hooykaas and composer and sound artist Caro C.
Madelon Hooykaas – moving image with live drawing and voice
Caro C – live sound and music (piano, voice and electronics)

This commission has been supported by the LYC Foundation

image credit: Madelon Hooykaas

Something HumanArts Council England Asia Arts Activism


VA Collective 3

6pm–8pm
A presentation and discussion about the Disability Arts Movement, Collections and non-political art.

Tony Heaton Great Britain from a Wheelchair 1994 courtesy of NDACA


Martin Parr: Return to Manchester, exhibition talk

6.30pm–7.30pm
Simon Bray, Photographer and Producer of Parr’s new commission gives his insights into working with the Magnum photographer.

Martin Parr, Manchester Irish Festival

VA Collective 3 | An introduction to the National Disability Arts Collection and Archive

The Venture Arts Collective has been established to host discussions and events for people who have an interest in the work of learning disabled artists in context with contemporary art and society.

During this event at Manchester Art Gallery, VA Collective 3, will give an introduction to the National Disability Arts Collection and Archive (NDACA). The invited speaker, Tony Heaton, is the initiator of NDACA, a practicing sculptor, Chair of Shape Arts in London and a Consultant/Advisor to many major cultural organisations across the UK including TATE.

Following this presentation, Venture Arts will present works by learning disabled artists from across the UK, leading into wider discussions about the place of non-political art both within the Disability Arts Movement and within the arts world more broadly.

The cafe bar will be open and you are very welcome to grab a drink from there and bring it into the lecture theatre.

Booking

If you would like to attend this event please book your free place via Eventbrite.

Access

This venue is wheelchair accessible. Please let Jennifer know if you have any other access requirements: jennifer@venturearts.org

Venture Arts

Venture Arts is a progressive visual arts organisation based in Hulme, working along learning disabled artists to create and show exciting new visual art work.

Image: Tony Heaton Great Britain from a Wheelchair 1994 courtesy of NDACA

Martin Parr: Tour with Paul Herrmann

Paul Herrmann, Photographer and Director of Redeye, The Photography Network, gives his response to the exhibition.